Cooking

Cocktails: Champagne with Citrus Popsicles

Cocktails is a Tablecrafter series on updated versions of classic alcoholic drinks.


Some things must be appreciated in their original state, but there's no denying that brainstorming the various ways to reinvent a classic is much too fun to completely forgo. In this recipe, we take the definitive French 75 and add an interesting twist. The citrus element of the cocktail comes in the form of an intensely flavored popsicle. Light, effervescent, and refreshing, our variation on the libation easily reminds us of the best summer cocktails we've had. 

Champagne with Citrus Popsicles

Yield: 8 popsicles
Time: 1 hour and 35 minutes (5 min prep / 1 hr 30 min freezing)


Ingredients:

  • 12 oz. champagne
  • ⅓ cup gin
  • ¼ cup simple syrup
  • ⅓ cup lemon juice

Procedure:

  1. Combine all the ingredients except for the champage and pour into popsicle molds and leave about ¼ of an inch allowance.
  2. Freeze for about 1 hour and 30 minutes or until solid.
  3. Serve popsicles inside a glass and pour champagne over.

Are you enjoying our version of the French 75 cocktail? Share your thoughts with us, email us at hello@tablecrafter.com. We'd love to hear from you!

Feature

Kombucha Dogs: Tea With a Heart

Commercial photographer Michael Faye retired with a twinkle in his eye: he was going to brew tea, instead.

Kombucha Dog, brewed in Los Angeles, does the double duty of perfecting kombucha and raising awareness for rescue dogs that need adoption. “Kombucha is a beverage that has been around for thousands of years,” said Faye. “People argue about the origin — whether it’s from Korea or Russia, but it’s from somewhere in east Asia.”

Basically a fermented tea that has low alcoholic content, he started brewing kombucha for himself, and then his friends. “It’s boiled, then when it’s cooled, we add raw, organic sugar,” said Faye. “The sweetened tea is inoculated with the yeast and bacteria, then allowed to ferment. The yeast and bacteria like the nitrogen in the tea and the minerals in the water. As it ferments, it makes probiotics, acetic acid and gluconic acid, which are fantastic antioxidants. The polyphenols in the tea remain in the kombucha.” When word got around and demand started to rise, Faye began producing kombucha for sale.

The labels are what caught our eye, however. The dogs on the labels are currently in no-kill shelters and are up for adoption. Once the dogs find their forever homes, the design is phased out.

The Dog Pack: Three bottles of Wild Blueberry, Ginger, Hint of Mint, and Just Kombucha, with a different dog up for adoption on each label.
Some of the dogs up for adoption. Click here to see the rest.

As much as we like to indulge in alcohol consumption for purely hedonistic purposes, here, the craft of fermenting tea is elevated to a nobler cause (and we like that all the more!)

Looking to give a dog its forever home? Check out Kombucha Dog's website.